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defense of marriage act which defines marriage as a union between a man and a woman. in california, proposition 8, a voter approved initiative prohibiting same-sex marriage. joining me now to weigh in on what we might expect from the high court is richard socarides former president of equality matters who also served as a senior adviser to president clinton. as always, thanks for joining us. >> thanks for having me. >> eliot: what is the importance of friday or monday, depending on which day the supreme court announces their decision. >> at the end of this week or on monday, we'll begin to hear from the supreme court what they're going to decide this term in relation to gay marriage and gay rights. we're almost assuredly in for a big decision from the supreme court by the end of this term. we may as early as monday, hear that they have decided not to accept for review, the all-important proposition 8 case in california. if that happens that means that in california, same-sex marriage would be legal again as early as ne
, a democratic candidate to beat jonathan paton. in california, the democrat there beats tony strickland. michigan's first. the republican, benishek, co mes out the victor. there are a few other outstanding ones. go to our web site c-span.org. as we told you yesterday, the state of florida had yet to be called. here is the "miami herald." we still do not know where the 29 electoral votes will go, but it has not made a difference in the overall outcome of the presidential election. back to the topic of what was your message to washington. a lot of newspaper articles this morning about the fiscal cliff. that is what faces these leaders as they make their way back to washington. here is the fiscal -- "the financial times." topping that list is paul ryan, the vice-president candidate returning to congress and has asked to continue on as chairman of the house budget committee. those are the people doing the negotiations. moving on to "the washington post." they know earlier wednesday barack obama call john boehner and others to urge them to put aside partisan interests to advance the interest
. republican losses tended to be a california and illinois where democrats redistricted against republican incumbent. so people you thought my is what with the tide -- might be swept out with the tide were not. republicans like to have a 10 year run because of detecting -- because of redistricting. republicans have touched the third real. you have better republicans back now, all of whom had to answer 100 questions about the ryan plan and block granting and medicare and survived. the new guys have to face the same question in. i would argue you have a republican party that not only touched the third round rail and did not end up where all the smart people knew you would end up if you discussed and talk of reform. and now 10 years of the republican house committed to these reforms. all the things people flail about. republicans have passed the budget on the subject in the house. obama's budget does that do any of the things you what it did it -- a budget to do over the next decade. those of the two competing mandates. obama, at first you get this i won re-election, i'm king, and then as eve
me take you into it. this morning, by far the worst weather all through california. i just read something that at some of the highest elevations in the mountains in california could get up to 100 inches of snow. 100 inches of snow over the next three to four days. crazy. it's raining hard this morning in san francisco to sacramento. san francisco, it's going to be a rainy three days. another big storm coming in saturday afternoon, saturday night. it's going to rain through sunday. you get a break monday, then another storm on tuesday. we have a lot of flooding concerns in the rivers in california in the days ahead. let me take you through the forecast as we go at it. this huge storm in the west, it's not going to move across the country. it's just going to stall out. if you're anywhere from denver to the east coast, don't expect a lot of wet weather this weekend. it should mostly be dry. and notice the temperatures. they're warming up in the middle of the country, and that will head east as we go throughout the weekend. so your friday forecast, really no airport concerns out the
of ballots are still being counted, 4 million in california alone. sometime today we think we will be officially the winter in florida. -- the winner in florida. as of right now, total turnout and number of voters has increased in colorado, iowa, minnesota, nevada, north carolina, and wisconsin. it looks like it decreased in 35 of 49 battleground states. the total turnout may be higher in 2008 when all the votes are finally counted. as we plan 4, total minority vote share increased to 28%. our coalition turnout, women made up about the same% of the electorate as in 2008. we got if you got% of women voters. for lots of reporting about youth turnout, they continue to turn out and take control of their future. in virginia, we increased our youth percentage. in florida, boating rates increased to 16%, and we got 61% in 2008 and 66% in 2012. african american turnout and support was as high or higher than ever. in ohio, african-americans increased from 11% to 15%. we got somewhere between 9% and 97% in every battle ground state. 71% of latino vote, the highest percentage of latino v
. it is incomeathome.com. incomeathome.com. out in san rafael, california, which i know very, very well. here's ken. ken, good morning. >> caller: good morning, bill. you know, i think petraeus got what he deserved. this woman is 20 years his junior. he sells the war in afghanistan to the president by undermining the president. and he followed the same processes that never work from algeria to today. it's never worked. never worked in algeria. it didn't work in vietnam or baghdad. it didn't work in kabul. he's promoted as a great general and a great man. this guy's a -- >> bill: ken wait. maybe he should have been fired because -- as you assert, if his policies are wrong then fire him because his policies are wrong. don't fire him because he cheats on his wife or he has an extramarital affair. >> caller: the point i'm making is that he is corrupt as a human being. just like the cowl mination -- the culmination of it. >> bill: i hear you. but i'm talking about on what basis do we decide someone should not be in their job.
in california. what happens if the court decides not to hear this one? >> it is tricky, don, because first of all, nothing is simple to the supreme court. it depends what the court does. the court could formally reject that case, which means the lower court ruling stands, so for proposition 8, a federal appeals court already ruled that the ban which passed as a referendum by the way is unconstitutional. so the supreme court rejecting the case would basically make same sex marriage legal again in california. this is another big point, though, the supreme court could simply decide just to sit on the case, not hear it this term, not reject it either and that basically would put the decision off to a later date. and then at that time, california would just sort of be stuck in a legal limbo until the court makes a decision. >> all right. so we'll just basically what you're saying we'll have to wait and see what happens on this one, right? >> yeah. >> several cases deal with doma, the defense of marriage act, is what we're talking about. what is at the heart of those cases and how likely is it t
society organizations which also features the involvement of the university of california san diego. working with the local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security so there are a lot of bottom-up approach is in changing the securities sector. in addition to the high level of policies that we have been discussing such as the initiatives for the police. >> okay. let's take this as our final question and then one more large question to pose to the panel before we break. >> my name is jason, an independent researcher and consultant on issues around policing and the conflict. my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will tweak it for to tunisia. i'm glad he mentioned his paper. it highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya conducting a light footprint and not the kosovo or afghanistan model with hundreds of thousands of people on the ground. and what sort of pushed the democratization and the ssr forward. so i guess the question for bob is what are the considerations to be engaged the conflict, post conflict ssr. what can
authority in california. the san francisco chronicle reporting a growing number of churches leasing space in their steeples for cell attenthat nae. it pays $4,000 a month. >>> all right. do you think bald is beautiful? i do. now it is downright profitable as well. the "new york daily news" telling the story of the nyu graduate from texas who turned his bald head into a business. the company is called bald logos. brandon and two other bald evangelicals sell ad space on their scalps for $320. they walk the streets. usually they are accompanied by two attractive females and a camera crew to give them attention. it is working. brandon plans to expand his business to several new cities soon. >> there you go. >> love that enterprising spirit. >> capitalism at work. >>> coming up, good news for the housing industry. we dig into those details where. home prices are rising, i'm going to tell you next. nd ppers baked in a ketchup glaze with savory gravy and mashed russet potatoes. what makes stouffer's meatloaf best of all? that moment you enjoy it at home. stouffer's. let's fix dinner. [ engine re
% of the rest of the population. on marriage, latinos were decisive to pass proposition 8 in california, 53% of latinos voted for proposition 8 in california. we are extremely conservative. we also have to understand there's a big difference between the old latino community of 20 or 30 years ago, the cesar chavez era, those in new york and those in the southwest since the u.s. to over parts of mexico, and then the new latino population that is 40% foreign- born, and the rest are children of immigrants, very conservative. when asked about the government they may give answers that are not extraordinary. sometimes we get tangled. we have seen this in this election cycle. on specific issues, if we had a better understanding on where they are coming from and a better understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. with the latino community i believe we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we would've had a better position on immigration from the get go, from the primary, governor romney would been competitive and he would've been competitive in battleground states where
with diane finestein. >>> coming up next, fallout from the petraeus resignation. joining me, california senator diane finestein, chair of the select committee on intelligence. nbc's pete williams and kristen welker and "the washington post's" davis ignatius. also, what did grover norquist just say? and david fromme on why mitt romney lost. and we'll honor our veterans next right here on "andrea mitchell reports," only on msnbc. can i still ship a gift in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. that was me... the day i learned i had to start insulin for my type 2 diabetes. me... thinking my only option was the vial and syringe dad used. and me... discovering once-daily levemir® flexpen. flexpen® is prefilled. doesn't need refrigeration for up to 42 days. no drawing from a vial. dial the exact dose. inject by pushing a button. flexpen® is insulin delivery... my way. levemir® (insulin detemir [rdna origin] injection) is a long-acting insuli
to life. on marriage, latinos were decisive to pass proposition eight in california, 53% of latinos voted for proposition eight in california. we are extremely conservative. i think, and we also have to understand there's some difference between the old latino community of say 20, 30 years ago what i call the cesar chavez a team community, and, the new york, the puerto ricans in new york and chicago, and those in the southwest, been in the u.s. since the was basically took half of mexico. and the new latino population which is foreign-born, 40% foreign-born, and the rest of the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary, but sometimes we get tangled, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we
for the landslide reelection of california governor in 2006. before that a top political advice sor in the white house of george w. bush. he attended the university of delaware from 1988 to 1993. david plouffe crossed paths in schmidt in the late 1980's. he completed his political seasons degree and finned two years ago. he has completed two presidential bids. he was appointed as a senior advice sor to the president in the white house in 2011. he attended is the marks high school before serving in a wide viret of state and national political campaigns. i'm going to ask the two speakers this evening to speak and i had to decide who is going to go first and i decided to use a standard that anyone this this audience could mean and that is whoever has won the most recent presidential election gets to speak first. i think that's the fair enough thing to do so please welcome david plouffe and steve schmidt to the university of delaware. [applause] >> thank you for joining thus evening. it's great to be back where steve and i had our interest in politics fostered and have such great memories of the uni
party to a degree. i admit i'm a nate tive california person and i didn't get it. ho can we have this dialogu without screaming at each other. >> c we talk to each other and not scream at one another? >> i hope so. i think when you look at our politics and look at some of the dysfunction in washington and now we have the fiscal cliff issue that is are fwfer congress and i think it's a real open question about whether we're going to have a politically induced recession. we're 40, 50 days away. you see a lot of turbulence in the markets over the next months but this is a political crisis that is going to be bring about an economic crisis if it doesn't get solved. but for the entire history of the country people do profoundly disagree with each other, have been and sometimes don't like each other very much have been able to sit across from each other and do the business of the american people. and that's what the moment requires now. on the question of screaming at each other we should understand that there are tremendous market incentives for people to go on tv and attack each othe
, california. according to local reports, that we can not confirm at this time, jon scott, this started over women's lingerie. jon: oh, no. jenna: this started in a victoria secret's shop before spilling out into the mall and that is when fists started to fly. >> two guys were fun muching each other. they ran over the barriers and one guy was getting his face stopped in. 2 was pretty crazy. jenna: three men were involved in the fight. they cleared out before police showed up. there you go. jon: i heard it described earlier as a fight over underwear. lingerie makes more sense. jenna: a little more classy? jon: i guess. jenna: either way a little silly, right? jon: very. somebody is nursing a bloody nose this morning. >>> right now the clock is ticking as we approach the fiscal cliff, automatic combo of tax likes and spending cuts which most experts say would plunge the country into another recession. tax hikes on wealthy americans a big sticking point because the taxpayer protection pledge promoted by grover norquist. he is lobbyist and conservative activists convinced all republican lawmaker
if the democrats because they could turn their state into greece or california. >> we are in washington and the wording goes back to 86, right? >> yes. part of passing the 86 bill. we did as americans for tax reform. >> the wording, except a few numbers, the wording of the pledge hasn't changed. in 1986 when people first sign that pledge, the federal budget deficit was 220 billion. this year is 1.1 trillion. how can you say nothing has changed across lots of things have changed if we elect, for so we elected bush to focus not on spending. look, people vastly between the pledge or creates all the worst problems and a fledgling does certain things. the pledge makes tax increases more difficult at the state level and at the national level. we haven't had republican vote for an income tax since 1990 when bush did and threw away his presidency. and 93 tax increase which has only a democratic votes and there were no tax increases until 2009 when obama came in and raise taxes with democrats. >> republican's line. isn't this a bit -- you were having republicans takes a very difficult pledge to
's announced policy of january 5, 2011, the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. hunter, for 30 minutes. mr. hunter: thank you, mr. speaker. it's my honor to come before you and speak about a true son of america who lost his battle with cancer six days ago on november 22. here's an article here from the local paper in san diego talking about dan mckennon and it says navy pilot, radio and airline executive, appointed to two federal boards and son of san diego congressman. those are a lot of things but dan was so much more than all of those even put together. first, his father was a democrat congressman from san diego here in the 1950's. probably stood at this table like i am speaking now. dan was a page when we still had pages in the house in the 1950's during the truman administration as well. he had a great respect and love for this country and he had a great respect and love for this body and the institution. he has some great claims to fame. one of those is this -- as a young man, dan served in the navy as a helicopter pilot and he's credited with 62 saves on land or sea. tha
intelligence committee chairwoman, dianne feinstein, from california, said some things that give you a big hint about where this might be headed. have a listen. >> do you think you need to hear from petraeus? >> we may well. and we may well ask. i think that's up to the committee. i think we should have this first hearing, which is the way they wanted to set it up, and then the committee will make the decision. >> so, the man who will testify is mike more re, petraeus' deputy at cia, a longstanding, highly respected intelligence professional. certainly he has all the information. maybe a political question, does congress want to compel petraeus to come out in public after all of this, and tell what he knows? >> wouldn't it be more politically expedient to compel him instead of may well have him come and testify to put all these conspiracy theorists to bed? >> well, you know, politics always trumps, doesn't it? i think that it's an unprecedented situation. so if they want to subpoena him, that may well be more of a political decision. the democrats, of course, control that committee on the senat
of the regulators of electricity in places like california and new york have figured out how to make it attractive to their energy providers to promote more efficiency through the advantage of the consumer by reducing rates. i think there are many things we will be able to agree on that will advance the cause of de-carbonizing the economy. >> the diversity of fuel sources and uses as well as efficiency travel parallel to the interests of good environmental policy. >> in 2007, congress agreed on standards, and the administration has continued to work to move those numbers up even more. there is a classic example where we actually did something that had a real impact. >> i wondered -- the recommendations you are making -- i understand you are trying to bring together these agencies across the executive branch. the legislative branch is very much a partner in this. how do your recommendations during the congressional leadership in and coordinate them as well as with the executive branch leadership? >> we will recommend that this be institutionalized or created also legislatively. but i think congress
where the democrats can turn their states into greece or california. >> the wording goes back to 1986. >> part of passing the 1986 bill, we did it as americans for tax reform. >> the wording of the pledge hasn't changed. in 1986 when people first signed that pledge, the federal budget deficit was $220 billion. this year, $1.1 trillion, how can you say nothing has changed? >> lots have changed. bush focused not on spending. the pledge only does certain things. the pledge makes tax increases more difficult at the state level, at the national level. you haven't had a republican vote for income tax since 1990 when bush threw away his presidency. 1993 tax increase, only on democratic votes. then no tax increases until 2009 when obama came in and raised taxes with obamacare. >> isn't this -- you are having republican is take a difficult pledge to cut taxes, isn't that like a quarterback saying they like taxes? --passes? >> it's a pledge not to increase taxes. people say why don't you toughen it. you don't want to change it because it is a simple guardrail. it doesn't solve the world's probl
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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